Posts tagged Cooking Skills

How To Make Cheese From Powdered Milk

A good one to have stored up the sleeve in case of necessity…

http://www.tacticalintelligence.net/blog/how-to-make-cheese-from-powdered-milk.htm

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A Polish Secret : Raspberry Cordial

I once worked with a lovely Polish lady called Maya. She grew up and lived in Poland under what was then the Russian state control, and her story of growing up and living in that system was fascinating. Many things that we take for granted with our supermarket and shop cultures today were unavailable to them then, and one particular thing she told me about stuck with me.

She was a great advocate of raspberry syrup, which they made themselves as a home-made medicine for a fantastic range of ailments. It was probably THE thing to have at all times at home in the  family”medicine chest”. I know that it is still renowned by the Polish because even the local supermarkets like Tesco here stock it on their Polish foods shelves. But it is easy to make and quite fun too and has a shelf life of two years, so below I shall put the recipe. You will need bottles with proper stoppers to seal it, these can be bought in various sizes from mail order companies supplying home cookware. Here in the UK I use a company called Lakeland for pretty much all my requirements. Of course being glass, they are reusable. I know that raspberry leaves are also used in traditional medicines but since my knowledge of this is very limited, I do intend to cover that here. Any search of the internet will soon yield results if that interests you. The raspberry syrup can be diluted for a refreshing drink, as can the blackcurrant which I also will give details for. We all know how high the vitamin C content in blackcurrant is. Later in the year [Autumn], I will give detail as to how to make rosehip syrup, so high in Vitamin C that children during the war were given days of school where they were expected to harvest rosehips for the nation’s health. Now they still grow in the hedgerows and are a much unused and under-valued free commodity.  Certainly as a child we were given a spoonful of rosehip syrup daily as our vitamin C boost [along with cod liver oil and malt extract before going to school]. I have made rosehip syrup for the past few years as I believe it, combined with vitamin D to be a very effective barrier to these horrid flu’s that pass round the world. Who knows…but its served me well so far anyway!

Before you start always remember that you bottles must be sterilised before use, either a quick cycle in the dishwasher or a hot wash and dry them in a low oven will do it. [Same is true for jam jars, preserving jars…]

Raspberry Syrup.

Raspberry syrup

You will need:

1 kg raspberries

75 ml water

Preserving or granulated sugar.

Put the raspberries and water in your bowl and mash well. Set over a pan of boiling water for 1 hour, mashing occasionally.

Pour into a sterilized jelly bag and leave for a few hours until the dripping has ceased. Squeeze the bag and then filter the juice through a double layer of muslin.

Measure your juice and allow 400 grams of sugar for every 500 ml of juice. Now put juice and sugar into pan and boil stirring until all the sugar is dissolved. Skim off any froth and boil hard for 4-5 minutes. Do not overcook though as mixture will start to set!

Pour into hot sterilized bottle and cork, or place stopper in. Leave to cool and cover cork with wax if you wish.

This amount will give about 750 ml of syrup. It can be diluted to drink, or poured over ice cream, and deserts.

Blackcurrant Syrup.

Blackcurrant syrup

You will need:

1 kg ripe blackcurrants

Preserving or granulated sugar.

Puree the blackcurrants in a food processor or liquidiser. Transfer to a bowl, cover, and leave for 24 hours.

Pour the puree into sterilised jelly bag and leave for a few hours until dripping ceases. Squeeze the bag, then filter juice through double layer of muslin.

Measure juice and add 400 grams sugar for every 500 grams of juice. Stir well until sugar has dissolved.

Pour juice into sterilised bottles, filling them to within 5 cm of the top. Cork. Wrap in cloth and stand on metal rack at base of large lidded pan. Pour in enough water to cover cork by 2.5 cm. Cover, bring to the boil and allow to boil for 25 minutes if using a 500 ml bottle. Remove from pan with tongs, leave to cool completely. Wax if desired.

As the blackcurrant syrup requires heat processing, it may pay you to make up several batches of this at same time, so they can all be popped into hot bath at same time for processing.

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Sweet Potato and Carrot Soup

This one is delicious, I am making some as we speak. Strangely, when cooked, it tastes just like tomato? Hey ho! I always cook my soups in the slow cooker on low, mainly because it is so easy, takes up so little space and can just bubble away. I use the large oval slow cooker, and just fill with mixture of peeled and chopped sweet potato, unpeeled and chopped carrot and a little peeled and chopped onion. I then add black pepper, a little salt and 3 pints of vegetable stock to fill to brim. I  cook this soup on low for around 6-8 hours, check that all veg are tender…then leave to cool and then liquidise. And there you have it. I make all my soups using the same principle, so made celery, potato and onion a couple of days ago, and will be making parsnip, celery and onion in a couple of days time. If you have a vegetable that does not thicken itself add potato to the ingredients mix. I also add cream cheese at the liquidising stage for some soups, especially broccoli or celery or leek. And try adding a cheese like stilton to celery for a really special taste!

Soups are very cheap to make, and release their energy slowly so are good for us all keeping us “fuller” for longer as well as containing so many vitamins, minerals and trace elements which are vital for health. If one is on a strict tight budget,  [who is not these days!] porridge in the morning, soup at lunch and a main meal later can reduce costs hugely whilst still eating good nutritious foods. And talking of that budget, fish is a fast to prepare/cook protein packed food and is very much cheaper than meat, whilst again, containing so much that is good for us. I always say that fish is my fast food, as most of it does not take more than 10-15 minutes to cook.

I will put up some recipe ideas for fish shortly; and in the meantime do experiment with soups if you have not done so before…tasty!

Sweet Potato

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